Improve Your Coding Skills with Medical Coding Training

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The field of medical coding is changing fast. New skills and competencies are becoming increasingly relevant every day, which are both an opportunity and an obstacle for experienced coders. If you make a serious effort to grow your skill set, you could quickly earn a higher salary, a promotion, or a prestigious new position. Rest on your laurels and you could just as quickly find your services irrelevant and unnecessary. To keep your  career moving forward, rely on these seven medical coding training development strategies:

Participate in a Specialty Society – The specialty society that applies to your particular coding discipline is a great resource. Sign up for their email list to get up-to-date information about coding rules and practices. Many of these societies also allow you to ask a limited number of coding questions, which is a real asset when you have a coding problem you can’t currently solve.

Listen to Teleconferences – The Medicare Administrative Contractors you work with likely publish teleconferences on a regular basis. Make sure you listen to these, and request transcripts for past conferences. You are likely to get answers to some of your most pressing questions while staying current on issues related to coding.

Access Webinars – Like teleconferences, webinars are a great way to get valuable education/information for little to no cost. Find webinars that are relevant to you, and try to involve other members of your coding team to improve your collective skill set.

Ask Google – You can find a lot of valuable free or low-cost information just by searching around online. This can include everything from scholarly articles, to free tutorials, to inexpensive educational materials. One trick to try is typing “site:cms.gov” into the Google search bar followed by your query. This will limit the results to pages from the CMS website.

Rely on Wikipedia – If you are unsure which ICD-9 or ICD-10 code applies to a certain diagnosis, you are likely to find it on Wikipedia. Other similar resources are also available, but Wikipedia proves to be particularly valuable for non-clinical coders because it typically explains the disease process and can lead you more reliably to the correct code in the diagnosis manual.

Join a Listserv – The medical coding community is very active online, and professionals are usually very willing to answer questions from peers. Find a forum with an active membership and start asking and answering questions. Not all the information you receive will be accurate or trustworthy, but this is still a resource worth relying on.

Make Time –Staying up-to-date can be a time and labor intensive process. The best strategy is to set aside an hour or two each week when you will focus exclusively on the previous six strategies. Make this a regular and ongoing process and you will keep yourself on the cutting edge.

If you’re ready to make a big leap forward, consider seeking out education and medical coder training from a team of professional coders. There is some cost involved, but it’s a valuable investment in your long-term success. Learn more by contacting the educators at MedPartners.

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